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Keeping up to date with research in your field (Part I)

No doubt about it, we must keep up with news and advances in our area of expertise. In this series of two posts I just want to introduce the ways I find useful in order to achieve this goal. Staying up-to-date means not only knowing what is being done in your field but also learning new skills, tools or tricks that might be applied. I will save for last some thoughts about getting a proper work-learning balance and potential impact on productivity.

  • Blogs. It might be an obvious one, but it is for sure one of my main sources of information. Several blogs I follow include: Getting Genetics Done, Genomes Unzipped, Our 2 SNPs, Wellcome Trust, R-BloggersSimply Statistics and many others mainly focused on biostatistics that you can find in our blog roll. Most of them are accessible through RSS feeds, if not through mail subscription.
  • Twitter. Most blogs have also a twitter account where you can follow their updates (so it might be an alternative). You can follow twitter accounts from networks of interest, companies or people working in your field too. For some ideas on whom to follow, go to our twitter!
  • PubMed / Journals alerting services. A keyword specific PubMed search can be just as relevant. Both available through email and RSS Feeds, you will get updates containing your search terms (for instance “Next Generation Sequencing”, “rare variant association analysis”, “Spastic Paraplegia”…). You can also get information about an author´s work or the citations of a given paper. You can find here how to do it.  An alternative is to set up alerts for Table of Contents of your journals of interests, informing of the topics of latest papers (Nature Genetics, Bioinformatics, Genome Research, Human Mutation, Biostatistics…) Accessing RSS Feeds through your mail app is straightforward -Mozilla Thunderbird in my case-.
  • Professional networking sites. Obviously, when it is all about networking, having a good network of colleagues is one of the best ways to keep up with job offers, news or links to resources. For instance through my LinkedIn contacts I receive quite a bunch of useful tips. Well selected LinkedIn groups are also a source of very valuable information and news, as well as companies in your area or work (pharma industry, genomic services, biostatistics/bioinformatics consulting). This is a more general site, but there are other professional sites focused on Research: ResearchGate and Mendeley. Mendeley in particular, apart from a networking site is an excellent reference manager. This, along with MyNCBI are the two main tools I use to keep my bibliography and searches organized.
  •  Distribution lists.  Apart from general distribution lists including one´s institution or funding agency, more specific newsletters or bulletins from networks as Biostatnet or  scientific societies you belong to, are a good source of news, events and so on, or even more restricted ones (for instance in my institution an R users list has been recently created).

To be continued next week …..

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