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Increasing your research visibility -through a personal website with GitHub-

Letting the world know about your work is important. This is true for any field of research, but for those of us working in any kind of computing-related field, it becomes even more relevant.

Professional networks, distribution lists, blogs and forums are an excellent way to keep up to date with research in your field (you can check a previous post on this topic here). Even social networks can be a great way to do so, depending on how you decide to use them. For instance, you can find quite a number of PostDoc positions posted on twitter.

There is another important aspect to consider as well. By being an active part of the community, not only do you gain visibility, but you also get the chance to contribute in return… How many issues have you solved through StackOverflow, Biostars, R-bloggers posts and so on? How many articles were you able to get through ResearchGate?

Back to the matter at hand, I have just recently found out about how to create a personal website with GitHub . If, like me, you do not know much about HTML programming, you might want to use the automatic page generator. I can tell you: if you have already figured out the content you want on it, and providing you already have a GitHub account, it will take you less than 5 minutes, (see a previous post on how to create an account here). Starting from a simple static web -simple is beautiful-, it can evolve into more sophisticated sites.

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‘Diss’ and tell!

Prior to our presentation at the JEDE III conference on “assessment of impact metrics and social network analysis”, we’d like to get a flavour of the research dissemination that’s going on out there so we can catalogue some of the resources used by researchers in Biostatistics. As Pilar mentioned in previous posts (read here and here), we’re active users of online tools such as PubMed and Stackoverflow, and although we’re relatively new to aggregators such as ResearchBlogging, we really believe in their value as disseminators in the current Biostatistics arena.

Still, we feel we must be missing many others…So we’re interested both in what you use to advance your research but also how you promote it.

We’d be very grateful for your answers to the following questions (we’ll show a summary of the responses at the end of the month):

We welcome your further comments on this topic below and look forward to reading your answers.  

Hopefully see you in Pamplona!

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Keeping up to date with research in your field (Part I)

No doubt about it, we must keep up with news and advances in our area of expertise. In this series of two posts I just want to introduce the ways I find useful in order to achieve this goal. Staying up-to-date means not only knowing what is being done in your field but also learning new skills, tools or tricks that might be applied. I will save for last some thoughts about getting a proper work-learning balance and potential impact on productivity.

  • Blogs. It might be an obvious one, but it is for sure one of my main sources of information. Several blogs I follow include: Getting Genetics Done, Genomes Unzipped, Our 2 SNPs, Wellcome Trust, R-BloggersSimply Statistics and many others mainly focused on biostatistics that you can find in our blog roll. Most of them are accessible through RSS feeds, if not through mail subscription.
  • Twitter. Most blogs have also a twitter account where you can follow their updates (so it might be an alternative). You can follow twitter accounts from networks of interest, companies or people working in your field too. For some ideas on whom to follow, go to our twitter!
  • PubMed / Journals alerting services. A keyword specific PubMed search can be just as relevant. Both available through email and RSS Feeds, you will get updates containing your search terms (for instance “Next Generation Sequencing”, “rare variant association analysis”, “Spastic Paraplegia”…). You can also get information about an author´s work or the citations of a given paper. You can find here how to do it.  An alternative is to set up alerts for Table of Contents of your journals of interests, informing of the topics of latest papers (Nature Genetics, Bioinformatics, Genome Research, Human Mutation, Biostatistics…) Accessing RSS Feeds through your mail app is straightforward -Mozilla Thunderbird in my case-.
  • Professional networking sites. Obviously, when it is all about networking, having a good network of colleagues is one of the best ways to keep up with job offers, news or links to resources. For instance through my LinkedIn contacts I receive quite a bunch of useful tips. Well selected LinkedIn groups are also a source of very valuable information and news, as well as companies in your area or work (pharma industry, genomic services, biostatistics/bioinformatics consulting). This is a more general site, but there are other professional sites focused on Research: ResearchGate and Mendeley. Mendeley in particular, apart from a networking site is an excellent reference manager. This, along with MyNCBI are the two main tools I use to keep my bibliography and searches organized.
  •  Distribution lists.  Apart from general distribution lists including one´s institution or funding agency, more specific newsletters or bulletins from networks as Biostatnet or  scientific societies you belong to, are a good source of news, events and so on, or even more restricted ones (for instance in my institution an R users list has been recently created).

To be continued next week …..